News Archives

Rousseau Exhibit to Focus on Dignity of the Human Person

Author: Joanna Basile

Julia Douthwaite, professor of French in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, is organizing a series of events to honor Swiss philosopher and writer Jean–Jacques Rousseau’s 300th birthday and stimulate a cross–disciplinary discussion on social justice and human dignity. The project, called Rousseau 2012: On the Road to DIGNITY, will be part of the curriculum for more than a dozen courses throughout the College of Arts and Letters and the Law School and will feature both guest lectures and an Amnesty International photography exhibit on poverty and human rights that includes portraits from Mexico, Egypt, Nigeria, India, and Macedonia. Read More

Notre Dame Among Top Producers of Fulbrights

Author: Arts and Letters

University of Notre Dame students were awarded 13 Fulbright grants for the 2011-12 academic year, placing the University among the top universities in the nation. Eleven of the 13 are from the College of Arts and Letters. The U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program, Fulbright recently announced the complete list of colleges and universities that produced the most 2011-2012 U.S. Fulbright students. Read More

History Alumna Inspires New Generation of College Students

Author: Joanna Basile

Notre Dame Department of History alumna Nicole Farmer Hurd ’92 was recently featured on NBC Nightly News With Brian Williams for her efforts to help disadvantaged high school students enter the world of higher education. Hurd is the founder and executive director of the National College Advising Corps (NCAC), a program that strives to increase the number and graduation rate of low-income, underrepresented, and first-generation college students. NCAC is housed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where Hurd also serves as a clinical assistant professor in the School of Education. Read More

Historian John Deak Awarded Fellowship to Austria

Author: Mike Danahey

University of Notre Dame Assistant History Professor John Deak jokes that working in the largely neglected field of administrative and constitutional history he’s “the nerdy guy who stands in the corner at cocktail parties.” But his scholarship has recently earned serious attention in the form of a Richard Plaschka Fellowship from the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science and Research. The fellowship will allow him to spend most of the next year in Vienna, working on his first book, Power and the Politics of State in Imperial Austria, 1848-1918. Read More

Three History Ph.D. Students Awarded Fulbrights

Author: Joanna Basile

Three doctoral students in Notre Dame’s Department of History have been named 2011 Fulbright Scholars. Max Deardorff, Nathan Gerth, and John Moscatiello will use their Fulbright funding in Russia and Spain to support research that spans education policy, government bureaucracy, and religion. Read More

Historian Thomas Noble Advocates Teacher-Scholar Model

Author: Kate Cohorst

In 2011, University of Notre Dame Professor Thomas F.X. Noble received the prestigious Otto Gründler Book Prize in medieval studies, a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, and the Sheedy Award—the highest teaching honor in the College of Arts and Letters. Read More

Historian Thomas Noble Advocates Teacher-Scholar Model

Author: Kate Cohorst

In 2011, University of Notre Dame Professor Thomas F.X. Noble received the prestigious Otto Gründler Book Prize in medieval studies, a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, and the Sheedy Award—the highest teaching honor in the College of Arts and Letters. Read More

History Major Provides Real-World Edge

Author: Kate Cohorst

As a student in Notre Dame’s Department of History, Colin Rich ’11 didn’t memorize the names and dates of significant World War I battles, and he can’t recite a list of every U.S. president and vice president. What he did learn as a history and economics major in the College of Arts and Letters was far more valuable: the ability to uncover how and why things happen, to speak persuasively, to write concisely, and to synthesize an array of sources into a cogent argument. Read More

New History Faculty Share Colonial Interests

Author: Mark Shuman

The Department of History’s two newest faculty members share a common interest in colonialism, although their research has led them to explore this issue in different parts of the globe. Rebecca Tinio McKenna, whose research has focused on the Philippines, and Paul Ocobock, a scholar of Africa, both join the University of Notre Dame as assistant professors this fall. Read More

History Alumna Inspires New Generation of College Students

Author: Joanna Basile

Notre Dame Department of History alumna Nicole Farmer Hurd ’92 was recently featured on NBC Nightly News With Brian Williams for her efforts to help disadvantaged high school students enter the world of higher education. Read More

Historian John Van Engen Compiles Rare Medieval Writings

Author: Sara Burnett

Around 600 years ago, a new kind of religious community emerged in the Low Countries: lay men and women moved into shared homes and dedicated their lives to prayer, work, and teaching, says John Van Engen, Andrew V. Tackes Professor of History at Notre Dame. Read More

History Department Announces Inaugural Klier Prize Winners

Author: Joanna Basile

Undergraduate student Thomas Dugan and graduate student Susy Sánchez have been named the recipients of the 2010–11 John Doyle Klier Prizes for scholarship and service to the University of Notre Dame’s Department of History. Thomas F.X. Noble was the recipient of this year’s Klier Professor Research Award. Read More

A Letter From the Chair

Author: Patrick Griffin

I am delighted to have been named chair of the Department of History at Notre Dame. That said, I have some big shoes to fill: Both my predecessors—John McGreevy, current dean of the ND College of Arts and Letters, and Tom Noble, former director of the Medieval Institute—did admirable jobs in leading the department. These are exciting times for us. Read More

History Ph.D. Candidate Wins Newcombe Fellowship

Author: Joanna Basile

Heath Carter, a graduate student in the University of Notre Dame’s Department of History, has been awarded a Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship for his work on the intersection of American religious and working-class history in the 19th and 20th centuries. Read More

Graduate Student Examines History of Native American Policies

Author: Joanna Basile

Although talk of extinction is often focused on plant and animal life, graduate student Myles Beaupre is researching what it means when extinction applies to an entire race of people. Beaupre, a doctoral candidate in the Department of History, is studying government policies on Native Americans throughout the development of the United States—from the British Empire-controlled colonies to the mid- to late-1800s of the newly formed country. Read More

Historian Felipe Fernández-Armesto Honored in Spain

Author: Kate Cohorst

Felipe Fernández-Armesto, William P. Reynolds Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, has been appointed the 2011 Cátedra Hispano-Británica Reina Victoria Eugenia at the Complutense University of Madrid. Read More

Historian Philip Gleason to Receive Honorary Degree

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Philip Gleason, professor emeritus of history at the University of Notre Dame, will receive an honorary degree from the University of Dayton April 13. The foremost living historian of American Catholicism, Gleason, whose scholarship also includes American intellectual history and immigration and ethnic history, was graduated from the University of Dayton in 1951. Read More

Rising historian wins $10,000 Shannon Prize

Author: Monica Caro

The University of Notre Dame’s Nanovic Institute for European Studies is pleased to announce that Tara Zahra has been awarded the $10,000 Laura Shannon Prize in Contemporary European Studies for her book “Kidnapped Souls: National Indifference and the Battle for Children in the Bohemian Lands 1900-1948,” published by Cornell University Press (2008).

The Shannon Prize is presented annually to the author of the best book in European studies that transcends a focus on any one country, state or people to stimulate new ways of thinking about contemporary Europe as a whole, and rotates between the humanities and history and social sciences. Read More

Historian Asher Kaufman Comments on Leaked Palestinian Papers

Author: Shannon Chapla

The recent leak of Palestinian documents pertaining to Israeli-Palestinian negotiations adds to the wave of other leaks of documents that have captured exaggerated attention, according to Asher Kaufman, associate professor of history and peace studies at the University of Notre Dame. “However, this may mark the first time Palestinian leadership was officially willing to reconcile with leaving certain communities under Israeli rule.” Read More